In the World
In the Cloud
In Philadelphia

Erica T. Carter

a haphazard vault installation of poetry generated under the pen name Erica T. Carter by Jim Carpenter's Electronic Text Composition (ETC) project

Values

Fields of Knowledge
  • Curatorial practice
  • Philosophy / Theory

Opens to public

06/11/2004

"Erica T. Carter: The Collected Works," a haphazard vault installation of poetry generated under the pen name Erica T. Carter by Jim Carpenter's Electronic Text Composition (ETC) project (April 17-June 10, 2004).

"Public Override Void," an installation of the Electronic Text Composition project, included self-service and automated poetry stations and wall panels of code. "Erica T. Carter: The Collected Works," features around 18,000 pages of poetry generated by three automated poetry stations (please note that the compressed files, downloadable above, are approximately 5-10mb each). A selection of around 2,500 pages has been randomly arranged about the vault floor; visitors are invited to walk on the poetry and, as in the preceding installation, leave with as many poems as they wish. Consider everything here public domain.

The Electronic Text Composition Project's Poetry Engine is a suite of software components that generate aesthetic texts. Drawing word associations from its language database, the Engine's grammar uses a probability-based approach to constructing syntactic constituents, which it aggregates into utterances, which it in turn aggregates into compositions. The project postulates that the construction of its texts does not actually occur within the software—these constructions, absent authorial intent and divorced from any underlying message, assume their status as poems only as they are read. The process of textual construction is firmly situated within the reader, not the software.

Information on the exhibition "Public Override Void," an overview of the project with examples of the code, and an audio recording of 49 poems generated by the poetry engine and edited by Jim Carpenter, has been made availabe online: http://slought.org/content/11207/

A recording of the public conversation between Bob Perelman, Nick Montfort, and Jean-Michel Rabaté is available: http://slought.org/content/11199/